Medical Treatment: Decisions and the Law

6. Going to Court

Co-authored by Emma Sutton and Frances McClenaghan.

Updates

Adrian Hopkins QC commented on Davies v Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust in the Medical Law Reports. Read his commentary here.

Contents

  • A Introduction  6.1
  • B Should you go to court?  6.2
  • Practice Guidance whether an application is necessary 6.5
  • Summary of what constitutes a deprivation of liberty 6.8
  • Key considerations before an application is made to the Court of Protection for adult patients 6.9
  • DNAR: specific issue  6.10
  • Key considerations before a court application is made for child patients (when the High Court is asked to exercise its inherent jurisdiction) 6.11
  • C Identifying the right court for medical treatment cases  6.13
  • Courts with jurisdiction to deal with medical treatment cases 6.13
  • The jurisdiction of the Court of Protection 6.14
  • Cases in which the Court of Protection lacks jurisdiction/cases which need to go to the High Court 6.15
  • 16 to 17 year olds: overlap of the jurisdiction of the Court of Protection and the High Court 6.16
  • Different age cut-offs for different types of case 6.17
  • Summary 6.18
  • D Procedural points common to the Court of Protection and the High Court 6.19
  • Public law issues  6.19
  • The timing of proceedings 6.20
  • How urgent is it? 6.22
  • Who should bring proceedings?  6.23
  • What does the party bringing the proceedings want? 6.25
  • Participation of P (the patient) 6.26
  • Does the patient need to be a party to proceedings?  6.27
  • The patient’s views on participation, and meeting the judge 6.28
  • The Official Solicitor and CAFCASS 6.29
  • Documentation    6.31
  • Bundles    6.31
  • Orders and position statements    6.32
  • Hearings  6.33
  • Typing up the order  6.34
  • E The Court of Protection 6.35
  • Location and judges 6.36
  • Sources of procedural rules and guidance 6.37
  • The court’s general approach 6.38
  • The court’s powers to make medical treatment decisions 6.39
  • Privacy and publicity – general issues 6.40
  • Court of Protection proceedings 6.41
  • Publication of judgments 6.42
  • Points to consider before starting proceedings 6.43
  • Pre-issue steps 6.43
  • Litigation friend  6.44
  • Is permission required?  6.47
  • Who should be named as respondents and who should be notified of the proceedings? 6.48
  • Level of judge  6.49
  • Starting proceedings – non-urgent 6.50
  • How are proceedings started?  6.50
  • Starting proceedings – urgent  6.52
  • First hearing and subsequent directions hearings 6.58
  • Final hearings 6.59
  • Costs  6.60
  • Costs of Official Solicitor 6.61
  • Appeals 6.62
  • F The High Court’s jurisdiction in relation to minors 6.63
  • The High Court generally 6.63
  • The High Court’s jurisdiction 6.63
  • Regional hearings 6.64
  • Procedure and rules  6.65
  • What cases should be brought to court? 6.66
  • General issues 6.66
  • Parental issues  6.68
  • Local authority issues  6.69
  • Imposing treatment despite competent refusal 6.70
  • Who should be the respondents? 6.75
  • Body responsible for treatment or care 6.75
  • The child? 6.76
  • Parents?  6.77
  • Local authority  6.78
  • Starting proceedings – non-urgent 6.79
  • Starting proceedings – urgent 6.81
  • Privacy and publicity 6.82
  • First hearing and subsequent directions hearings 6.83
  • What to expect at a final hearing 6.84
  • Costs  6.86
  • Appeals  6.87
  • G The High Court’s inherent jurisdiction – in relation to ‘vulnerable adults’ 6.88
  • H Conclusion  6.89
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